Traveling

14.25″ x 5.5″ Acrylic on reclaimed wood, $316 (US shipping included)

The little curved black area at the top right and the thin black line at the bottom are not part of the painting, they’re areas where the wood doesn’t conform neatly to the rigid straight lines of the graphic image. What do you expect? It’s leftover wood from some project or other. I think these imperfections give the artworks an extra bit of character. Plus, I feel good that it didn’t go into a landfill. (You can feel good about it too, if you buy it! 😄)

Of course, I make sure to seal the wood with acrylic medium and multiple coats of acrylic gesso before painting to make sure the art itself is as archival as that painted on any traditional support.

I have no idea if people are going to respond positively to the recycled aspect or not, but it means something to me, so I’m going to keep going with it, as well as continuing to paint on traditional supports like panels and canvas.

So what does the title mean? Does it evoke traveling to you? My wife Tekakwitha came up with the title when I was stumped, and I can totally relate to it. 

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Kundalini With Pink Stars

Acrylic on recycled wood, 14.24″x6.5″ (approximately)

This painting is on reclaimed 3/4″ scrap plywood. The black line at the bottom right is not part of the painting, but is where the wood is missing from where it was cut as part of some project.

These paintings on reclaimed scrap wood are sometimes not square, having angles, saw marks, and other imperfections. The left side of this painting is not straight, although this doesn’t show in the picture.

I love the idea of painting on something that was destined for the landfill. Making something beautiful out of something that absolutely was not. Kind of like what can happen with our lives, don’t you think?

This painting is available at my main website: spyderwebbfineart.com

If you like this painting, please share — it really helps!

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If you’d like to consider supporting my work on a monthly basis (for as little as $1 a month) and keep me painting, I’d love to have you join my team and get available discounts on original art and exclusive behind the scenes content:  patreon.com/spyderwebb

The Red Bridge

Acrylic on stretched canvas, 10″x10″

So maybe it doesn’t look like a bridge to you.

It didn’t to me either, but that was the first thing my wife saw, and I liked that.

I just finished rereading The Legend of Bagger Vance by Stephen Pressfield (stay with me here) and there’s a lot in that book that isn’t about golf. In fact, the book isn’t really about golf at all, golf is just the vehicle for the meaningful stuff. I also found out that the book was based on the Bhagavad Gita.

There’s a lot of talk in the story about finding your authentic swing. And of course, your authentic swing is what you have to find in life, whether it’s your golf game, your painting game, your relationships, or your own spiritual journey.

I feel like I’ve been honing in on my authentic painting swing for the past year. I’ve come close in my career, but never as much as recently. And like Rannulph Junah, the protagonist in the story, I found it, then got in my head and lost it, and have come back to it now with greater understanding. I don’t find my painting path, my painting path finds me. And then I get out of the way and allow it to paint through me.

Kind of like getting on a ride at a theme park.

Oh, and the field of flowers or the bridge? It makes absolutely no difference. That’s head stuff that happens after the fact. I present the painting with a name that serves as an identifier, with some reference however tenuous, to the imagery so the title can be a useful tag.

The Hills Are Alive With the Sounds of Pharaoh

Acrylic on stretched canvas, 10″x10″


This is the last (for a while at least) of the pharaoh/pyramid/children of immigrants paintings. It’s another one with the more random dot colors in several areas of the painting where appropriate. I think I’ll stay with this approach.

Some aspects of nature (crystals, for example) are very structured and ordered. Others appear almost random. I’m not going to get into chaos theory here, and of course I’m not attempting to describe these things literally. It’s more like I’m riffing on them.

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Sunrise Over The Hills

Acrylic on canvas board, 6″x6″ $96 (shipping included)


What do you see first? The sunrise or the fire coming over the hills? the first thing I saw was the fire, but after a while I saw a sunrise.

Maybe it’s both. the destruction of a massive fire followed by the promise of a bright new day. Sound familiar? That could apply to a lot of things in life, couldn’t it?

I deliberately made the colors in the dots in some ares more random to add texture. First time I’ve done this. I have a larger one I’ll be posting that’s the second one done that way. This was more of a quick experiment, but I’m pretty happy with the way it turned out.

Pyramids and green rolling hills and being the child of an immigrant

I’ve been thinking about these pyramid paintings I’ve been turning out lately. Although I grew up in Latin America, and saw my fair share of the pyramids there, these are clearly Egyptian pyramids. So why have I been placing them in landscapes that look more like the southeast USA?

Maybe it’s my subconscious trying to integrate the two sides of my heritage. I think children of immigrants, that is those born in the US of immigrant parents, have a lot of work trying to integrate both cultures, traditions and family styles. My mother was born in Cairo, and immigrated to the US as a teen nearly a hundred years ago, together with one of her sisters. She was a Catholic and a francophone, so that added to my cultural confusion. I learned a bit of French growing up, but not a word of Arabic. My father was born in Virginia of parents from the hills of east Tennessee, with roots going back to protestant Scots-Irish settlers in the mid 18th century.

I never really felt connected with either side, much to my puzzlement. Understandably I guess, I always felt much more connected to Latin American culture, and I feel a bit more Latino than anything else. I guess there’s a little of the Central American Jungle in some of these pictures also.

The pyramids popping up in these landscapes also remind me of the view from the back porch of the house where my parents retired in Charlottesville, Virginia with a beautiful view of the Blue Ridge mountains and Buck mountain in particular, front and center, vaguely pyramidical in shape.

I’ve only recently started to feel some connection to the Egyptian/Middle Eastern heritage when I said out loud something about “my Middle Eastern heritage.” For some reason, that struck me in a way it never had before.

Funny how we sometimes have to work things out symbolically instead of addressing them head on.

Cry Me a Pharaoh

Acrylic on canvas, 10″x10″ $160

Not a Beatles song this time!

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If you’d like to consider supporting my work on a monthly basis (for as little as $1 a month) and keep me painting, I’d love to have you join my team and get discounts on original art and exclusive behind the scenes content:  patreon.com/spyderwebb

Pharaoh On The Hill

9″x12″ Acrylic on canvas board $168 & free shipping

The third in the series of song title inspired paintings, and the second with a Beatles inspired title.

It almost looks kind of musical, doesn’t it?

Of course, I don’t mean to imply that the fool on the hill and any pharaoh might have anything in common, but I guess there might have been a pharaoh or two who fit that description. Law of averages among humans, I suppose.

Any thoughts on further Beatles inspired titles that could be adapted to this series?

Magical Pharaoh Tour (or Pharaoh Mystery Tour perhaps)? Pharaoh Lane? Here Comes the Pharaoh? While My Pharaoh Gently Weeps? Strawberry Pharaohs Forever? Pharaoh’s Lonely Hearts Club Band? Norwegian Pharaoh?

Well, you get the idea. Doesn’t have to be Beatles (the next painting isn’t) but if something strikes your fancy, let me know in the comments.

Pharaoh In The Sky With Diamonds

9″x12″ Acrylic on canvas board. $168

The second in the Pharaoh series and the second with a song inspired title. It doesn’t mean anything profound, it’s just a whimsical title.

Of course if you have a profound interpretation, I would really love to read it!

In the meantime, we’re just having fun with paints.

The Pharaoh Sleeps Tonight

The Pharaoh Sleeps Tonight Acrylic on canvas board, 9″x12″

“…in the jungle, the mighty jungle”

My wife said it should be “in the desert” if it’s a pharaoh — but I pointed out that it’s a jungle in the painting. Then she said well then it’s a Central American pyramid. But it’s definitely an Egyptian pyramid. Not at all like the Central American ones. 

Of course the desert was once lush and tropical, so either I’m conflating two different times or this is revisionist archaeology.

Or something…

It’s just a painting. Give me a break.

If you like this painting, please share — it really helps!

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Follow me on Instagram: @webb.spyder

If you’d like to consider supporting my work on a monthly basis (for as little as $1 a month) and keep me painting, I’d love to have you join my team and get exclusive behind the scenes content:  patreon.com/spyderwebb